Project Spotlights - Construction

Environmental Shelter for Arctic Winter Construction
Project Description: Environmental Shelter for Arctic Winter Construction
Client Name: A Consortium of Companies
Project Location: Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

Introduction

A deteriorated concrete floor on the top of a module; also serving as a roof to the below module; needed replacement.  The plant is located in the Prudhoe Bay area in Alaska and for process reasons, required the construction to be performed during arctic winter months. The arctic winter conditions created a very challenging environment for placing concrete and specialty coating application work unless the environment around the work zone had  a climate control system.

Project Scope

The scope of the project required to remove and replace the existing concrete floor/roof, fix and strengthen all necessary steel structural components, apply specialty coatings for waterproofing and steel corrosion resistance.

Project Challenge

All the work needed to be performed following strict safety rules, with minimal impact to the plant's production, and be environmentally friendly.

Project Solution

A difficult environment, with wind chills below negative 80 degrees F, was overcome by designing and building an insulated work shelter to provide a safe and functional environment to perform all necessary work according to the many safety and environmental specifications required. The work site was divided into three zones.

The first zone was built on the top of the scaffold structure surrounding the top of the module.  This provided a clean, dry and warm environment for the job to be performed. The zone was accessed through a stair case installed from the ground level connected to second zone. All the materials were transported to the top of the zone with two transport platforms. The area was heated with indirect fired heaters installed on the ground.  The zone also had an emergency staircase.  The zone was instrumented and controlled to maintain heat, remove dust, check for the presence of hydrocarbon, etc.

The second zone served as a containment area. This zone served as material storage and a clean area for the personnel to change and gather for safety meetings, toolbox talks etc.

The third zone was utilized only during the concrete pour. This area did not utilize any insulation other than when it was covered with a waterproofed/wind barrier to the outside. This area was only heated during the pour to avoid any fresh concrete problems due to arctic temperatures.

Project Results

The success of the project was greatly due to the organization, unique solution approach and great team work. This project is proof that great communication between involved parties is a successful way to achieve great things. Performing the construction during the winter months allowed the plant to stay operational, saving the Owners considerable cost by keeping up with the production goals.



Modularization Project
Project Description: Modular execution for construction of Tail Gas Cleanup Unit (TGCU).
Client Name: ExxonMobil
Project Location: Channahon, IL

Introduction

The project was looking for improved quality and schedule while adhering to budget constraints and zero safety incidents. A modular approach was selected to execute fabrication in a controlled shop environment as opposed to stick-built under Midwest weather conditions.

Project Scope

Design of a new TGCU to be placed within an existing refinery utilizing the modular approach to construction. The mandate was to maximize value as opposed to necessarily maximizing a singular construction method. The final analysis proved the more the unit could be modularized, the greater the value to the Owner.

Project Challenge

This project was one of the first upstream/onshore modular execution projects in Owner's history and the largest in scope at that time. Further, the refinery is inland which added to the transportation complications. Nevertheless, this important environmental improvement project had to meet a hard schedule deadline and cost restriction.

Project Solution

Brindley Engineering's extensive experience in modular construction execution provided the predictability to the process through visualizing the key steps from field commissioning backward through field erection, transportation, shop fabrication, and procurement. Organizing the key execution steps and conducting a value and risk analysis of various possible approaches provided the best path forward.

Project Results

Project was executed safely, ahead of budget, and on schedule. Quality of the fabrication was high and on-stream availability remains exceptional.

 

Stats

Year Completed = 2009 
Number of Modules = 12 
Number of Free Standing Equipment = 6 
Peak Craft Manpower = 225



Tank Roof Lift Plan
Project Description: Lift Plan for 150 ft diameter Geodesic Tank Roof Installation
Client Name: Central Crane
Project Location: Tank Farm near Indianapolis

Introduction

Brindley Engineering was contracted to provide an engineering lift plan for the installation of multiple tank roofs at a new extension to a tank farm near Indianapolis.

Project Scope

Full engineering lift plan of the roof installation at the tank farm. Also provide technical support throughout the entire project and work together with the Client / Crane Company to provide the safest and most efficient lift plan.

Project Challenge

The most challenging aspect of the project was accounting for the potentially high wind load acting on the roof.  Roof sway had to be minimized during the lift and accurate communication with all parties was challenging considering the tight clearances.

  • - Limiting the roof from swaying during lifting
  • - Lack of communication and time of delay in correspondence between all parties involved.

Project Solution

Brindley Engineering has particular expertise in the application of wind loads onto lifted loads and was able to determine the correct crane size, rigging, and grade support to safely complete the lift.

Project Results

The equipment was able to be installed safely and per plan.

 

Stats

The tank roof was 150’-0” diameter and was 26’-0” in height and total weight of 50,500 lbs.



Electrical Building Lift Plan
Project Description: Transportation and Lifting of a 3 segment PDC building
Client Name: BP Refinery
Project Location: Houston, Texas and Whiting, Indiana

Introduction

One of Brindley Engineering’s core services is Construction Engineering, of which, we do a considerable amount of engineered transportation and lift plans.  A new unit at the refinery was being built that included the installation of a new Power Distribution Center (PDC) building for the unit. The PDC was to be safely transported from Houston, Texas to the refinery and lifted into its final position.

Project Scope

Brindley Engineering created the transportation plan between the fabrication facility and the refinery, as well as the transportation and engineering lift plan for offloading.  We also designed the Engineering Lift Plan for the self-propelled modular trailers (SPMT) and setting the PDC into its final position.

Project Challenge

The first challenge was to safely deliver the building from Houston, TX to Whiting, IN. The middle section of the building was reaching the maximum allowable height of overland travel. The biggest concern was possibly hitting overhead bridges during transportation.
The second challenge was the setting of the building from SPMTs on top of the final piers in the unit. The southernmost segment was the heaviest but the precast piers limited possible crane positions.  The challenge was figuring out whether an especially large crane was to be selected or extensive ground preparation was to be done.

Project Solution

BEC conducted the transportation survey and plotted the whole building travel path pointing out the bridges that were within 6” of the travel height. Our research altered the initially proposed route provided by the transportation company to avoid the critical bridges.

Brindley Engineering had optimized the ground preparation so that the originally specified crane was able to be set up at an optimal position to perform all necessary lifts. While at the same time not damaging the previously set piers and transformer foundations.

Project Results

The project was a great success.  We avoided major delays in transportation due to obstructions that would have been encountered and saved considerable time and expense by developing a highly complicated lifting and setting plan.

 

Stats

Total lift weight: 392,150 lbs.
Max Travel height: 15’-10”




Flare Derricks
Project Description: Support 200 ft flare during construction modifications.
Client Name: BP
Project Location: Whiting, IN

Introduction

An environmental project  consists of adding a new flare gas recovery (FGR) unit to reduce emissions on a flare. This modification requires the bottom portion of derricked flares to be removed and replaced with new tie-in spool sections without removing the entire flare. During this modification, the upper portion of the flare required support by the existing derrick structure or an additional temporary structure coming down to grade.

Project Scope

The project was a multipart project with the same objective on 5 different flares. The objective of the project was to determine a way to accommodate the new FGR tie-in installation without having to remove the entire flare.  The flare is approximately 200 ft tall, with plenty of valves and piping connected to it, and an existing derrick structure around it, which in summation would make a total flare removal very difficult from a constructability standpoint.

Project Challenge

There were several major challenges on this project.  Brindley Engineering needed to qualify the existing derrick structure (light steel construction) to support the flare.  We also needed to install new steel through existing structures and piping, which led to irregular geometries.  Due to geotechnical concerns and limited excavation clearances, we used temporary mat foundations instead of cast-in-place concrete foundations with limited footprint space.

Project Solution

Two flares were able to qualify the existing derrick structure to receive the vertical load, with some reinforcing installed. The remaining three flares needed an additional support structure installed coming down to grade.

Project Results

All steel was erected as designed with no issues. The design was shop welded/field bolted which reduced permitting and field work time.